• Design Spotlight,  Featured,  Print Edition

    Beautiful function

    “We humans try to alienate beauty from function. We have evolved with beauty around us. Everything we look at is beautiful: a stone is beautiful, a mountain is beautiful, an autumn leaf falling is beautiful, and a flower is beautiful. The flower is the most functional element on the tree,” said Jeevak Badve, vice president and director of strategic growth at Sundberg-Ferar Inc. in Walled Lake, Michigan. “It is function and beauty—you can see it in nature and non-man-made objects—it is always there; so why are we delinking that? Why can’t we use it for our benefit?” Badve added. Leveraging this inherent relationship between function and beauty, which Badve noted…

  • Creative Endeavors,  Featured,  Print Edition

    The personal touch

    In today’s technological age of touch screens and automation, Talin Spring, owner and designer of Spring Finn & Co. in Minneapolis, believes in the importance of tactility. “In everything I do, above all, I think about the human experience, whether it is a bag or a room,” Spring said. “I look into making it for longevity with materials that will become more beautiful with age; that will bring a joy and well-being to the person who is using it.” While born into a family of skilled embroiderers, sewers, knitters, leather lovers, and shoemakers in Istanbul, Turkey, and having spent most of her life in France—a place that has captivated fine…

  • Architecture,  Featured,  Form,  Print Edition

    Aimee P.C. Buccellato, LEED AP

    Aimee P.C. Buccellato, LEED AP, partner at Buccellato Design LLC in South Bend, Indiana, and Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture, was drawn to the beautiful and complex process of design and architecture early on in life. From Lego building blocks, drawings, and summer visits to her mother’s childhood home—a Pompeiian villa replica—to witnessing a residential redesign, Buccellato can remember those early childhood influences on her career as vividly as the Latin words etched in a marble mosaic floor, or the faint aroma from old blueprints. “I remember visiting that [villa] every summer and walking its grounds, which happened to be very fragrant, formal…

  • Print Edition

    Great Lakes By Design: Informed Future

    CONTENTS: Design Corner RESIDENSITY an exploration of the ideal sustainable built environment The Faygo Book the origin story and conversation about the beverage company that took Detroit by storm Sovereign the new collection by an international fabrics source inspired by classic architecture and heraldic designs   Design Spotlight Redefining space an experiential technology company creating custom experiences for clients Intuitive design a multidisciplinary firm integrating innovative technologies in the design process Lakefront heritage the educational and cultural inspiration behind a renovation of a greenhouse on Lake Couchiching in Orillia, Ontario   Form Modern lodge the contemporary, coastal lodge on Lake Michigan designed and built by the team of DeHaan Homes…

  • Featured,  Form,  Print Edition

    Sarah Bourgeois, AIA

    Sarah Bourgeois, AIA, architect and owner of Sarah Bourgeois Architects in Traverse City, Michigan considers design as well-thought out, having proportion and scale, and a convergence of a lot of moving parts—but whether it is a good design or bad design, and what makes it so, is often in the eye of the beholder. “There are rules we start off with and ideas are often driven by clients—there are a lot of outside forces—but can it stand the test of time?” Bourgeois said. While officially launching her own venture in Traverse City around 2010, Bourgeois has had more than 20 years of commercial and residential experience. Sarah Bourgeois Architects has…

  • Featured,  Print Edition

    Kevin Buccellato, AIA, NCARB

    “My parents did a small addition when we were growing up. I was the youngest of three boys and I was always the one that would sit through the meetings with the architect,” said Kevin Buccellato, AIA, NCARB, architect and partner at Buccellato Design LLC in South Bend, Indiana. “It was fascinating to me, pouring over his blueprints, and meanwhile living in the house as that small kitchen addition was being built was really probably a pretty formative experience for me.” Buccellato has had nearly two decades of experience practicing in the field of architecture and spent about 10 of those years establishing and growing Buccellato Design’s award-winning portfolio with…

  • Featured,  Print Edition,  Relish

    Nutritional alchemy

    “When I started cooking it was more about just healthy food, and then it evolved into a highly specific diet,” said Kendra Peterson, founder of the private chef services firm Drizzle Kitchen in Chicago, Illinois.  “We focus on the presence of nutritionally dense foods. I like to use the phrase ‘nutritionally dense,’ because I find that ‘healthy’ is such an ambiguous word. The idea behind how we cook in this way is important, because we don’t often realize how much nutrition we can pack into something while still keeping it delicious and safe to eat. If it’s not delicious, you’re not going to eat it no matter how healthy it…

  • Featured,  Print Edition

    Eric De Witt, AIA

    “Design is not a thing you are either doing or not doing; it is just a part of who you are. It is not like a light switch that you can turn on or off: it is an approach to problem-solving, it is an approach to life,” said Eric De Witt, AIA, architect and owner of Lucid Architecture in Zeeland, Michigan. “You are looking at problems as opportunities, or challenges as opportunities, to create something better and it is really about creating better experiences for people—whether that is how you use your phone, and how you get out of bed in the morning, or what you see when you drink…

  • Architecture,  Featured,  Print Edition

    Brent R. Dykstra, LEED AP

    Brent Dykstra, LEED AP, senior architect and senior associate at AMDG Architects, Incorporated in Grand Rapids, Michigan knew he wanted to be an architect when he was about 12- or 13-years-old; although he didn’t completely know what it meant at the time.  “It seemed like the right convergence of practical problem solving and artistic creation. I don’t think I ever felt like I wanted to go into a pure engineering side and I think I felt too practical to be an artist—and probably not creative enough—and I enjoyed history,” Dykstra said. “I think I’ve always just enjoyed understanding how things are the way they are.” Dykstra joined AMDG Architects in…