• Featured,  Print Edition

    Kevin Buccellato, AIA, NCARB

    “My parents did a small addition when we were growing up. I was the youngest of three boys and I was always the one that would sit through the meetings with the architect,” said Kevin Buccellato, AIA, NCARB, architect and partner at Buccellato Design LLC in South Bend, Indiana. “It was fascinating to me, pouring over his blueprints, and meanwhile living in the house as that small kitchen addition was being built was really probably a pretty formative experience for me.” Buccellato has had nearly two decades of experience practicing in the field of architecture and spent about 10 of those years establishing and growing Buccellato Design’s award-winning portfolio with…

  • Creative Endeavors,  Featured

    Sensory showroom

    For many, the heart of a home is its kitchen: a space that is shared and enjoyed along with the dishes it creates. The space is often a central nexus, supported by a series of appliances that are inherent to its function. Since 1945, the Sub-Zero brand—along with the newer additions of Wolf and Cove—has functioned as an industry leader in creating culinary appliances that focus on cooking, food storage, and kitchen cleanliness. All three brands, established by Sub-Zero, Inc., a Madison, Wisconsin-based firm and manufacturer, have shaped the culinary appliance industry for more than 80 years in part by creating comprehensive, exciting show rooms that focus on hands-on education…

  • Featured,  Print Edition,  Relish

    Nutritional alchemy

    “When I started cooking it was more about just healthy food, and then it evolved into a highly specific diet,” said Kendra Peterson, founder of the private chef services firm Drizzle Kitchen in Chicago, Illinois.  “We focus on the presence of nutritionally dense foods. I like to use the phrase ‘nutritionally dense,’ because I find that ‘healthy’ is such an ambiguous word. The idea behind how we cook in this way is important, because we don’t often realize how much nutrition we can pack into something while still keeping it delicious and safe to eat. If it’s not delicious, you’re not going to eat it no matter how healthy it…

  • Featured,  Print Edition

    Eric De Witt, AIA

    “Design is not a thing you are either doing or not doing; it is just a part of who you are. It is not like a light switch that you can turn on or off: it is an approach to problem-solving, it is an approach to life,” said Eric De Witt, AIA, architect and owner of Lucid Architecture in Zeeland, Michigan. “You are looking at problems as opportunities, or challenges as opportunities, to create something better and it is really about creating better experiences for people—whether that is how you use your phone, and how you get out of bed in the morning, or what you see when you drink…

  • Architecture,  Featured,  Form

    The southwestern contemporary

    Northern Michigan residential design often captures the intersection of breezy summer style oriented toward the area’s bounty of lakes and rivers, and the practical features necessary to withstand Midwest winters, which have recently pushed historical records.  With a preference for the former, one homeowner in Northport, Michigan collaborated with Mapleridge Construction LLC, a custom home builder in Williamsburg, Michigan, to fit a contemporary, southwestern-inspired home within its setting on Lake Michigan in the summer of 2018. When approached with an initial design plan, Scott Naumes, co-owner of Mapleridge Construction, worked to create multiple renderings of it to incorporate the desired style and structural elements practical for all seasons.  “It gave…

  • Architecture,  Featured,  Print Edition

    Brent R. Dykstra, LEED AP

    Brent Dykstra, LEED AP, senior architect and senior associate at AMDG Architects, Incorporated in Grand Rapids, Michigan knew he wanted to be an architect when he was about 12- or 13-years-old; although he didn’t completely know what it meant at the time.  “It seemed like the right convergence of practical problem solving and artistic creation. I don’t think I ever felt like I wanted to go into a pure engineering side and I think I felt too practical to be an artist—and probably not creative enough—and I enjoyed history,” Dykstra said. “I think I’ve always just enjoyed understanding how things are the way they are.” Dykstra joined AMDG Architects in…

  • Creative Endeavors,  Featured

    Personal affects

    Before Dawn Marie Coe, founder and chief creative officer at DMC Design LLC, launched her own firm in 2011, she had a naturally-keen eye for interior details and how they paired with their architectural surroundings.  “I noticed I had an eye for not just looking at those little things, but also asking the right questions to see if [homeowners] needed their space transformed beyond paint colors and furnishings,” Coe said. “I typically ended up going toward more of an architectural and spatial planning [point-of-view]. It was a hobby, but then it became something that was full-time and bigger than just furniture and paint colors; that is when I knew I…

  • Featured,  Form

    Diverse craft

    Variation in project scope and typology often brings new opportunities to play with different architectural styles, and for Elaine Keiser, AIA, architect and principal of Elaine Keiser Architect, Inc., those opportunities bring a breath of fresh air and thrill.  “I really embrace the idea that we can venture out into different styles of architecture and find some new way to bring them together for what the client is looking for,” Keiser said. “What we design is tailored to them and that makes it a lot of fun and very interesting for everybody involved. I’m not stuck on any particular type of design.” Keiser, who is a licensed architect in seven…

  • Featured,  Travel

    Celebrated history 

    Northern Michigan is often known as a vibrant tourist destination due to its valuable natural resources and seasonal beauty. Since the 1870s—and as railroads expanded their lines to reach more corners of the area—hidden gems such as Walloon Lake were exposed to the yearly influx of visitors from cities such as Cincinnati, Indianapolis, and Chicago.  To participate in the industry expansion, Hotel Walloon was built in the 1890s and featured stylish parlors, wrap-around porches, and embellished woodwork. The newest rendition of Hotel Walloon, developed by real estate developers Jonathan and Matt Borisch in 2015, is at the forefront of the Village of Walloon Lake’s intimate-yet-bustling tourism industry and is styled…